Monday, December 25, 2017

Week 2/Day 1 - Activity 2: The Right to Vote ll Summer Learning Journey

Activity 2: The Right to Vote
At the turn of the century, New Zealand elected its first ever government. Richard John Seddon served as the leader of the Liberal Party from 1893-1906. Prior to 1893, only men were legally allowed to vote. This all changed in the late 1800s when a woman named Kate Sheppard lead a suffragist movement in New Zealand calling for a change in law. Her hard work finally paid off when the Electoral Act was passed into law on 19 September 1893, giving women the right to vote. New Zealand was the first country to give all women the right to vote. There were still countries in the world (e.g. Saudi Arabia) who, until recently, did not allow women to vote.

On your blog tell us what you think about the fact that women were not allowed to vote in Saudi Arabia until 2015. Is it fair? Why or why not?

Work Below!

Week 2 - Day 1: Activity 1 The Early Years (Late 1800s – 1919)

Day 1: The Early Years (Late 1800s – 1919)

Activity 1: St Joseph’s Cathedral
At the turn of the century, there was a great deal of construction happening in New Zealand. Many of the new British settlers wanted to build homes and community meeting places, such as churches. One of the largest buildings to be constructed during this period was St Joseph’s Cathedral in Dunedin.

St Joseph’s Cathedral is just one of the hundreds of beautiful cathedrals around the world.

Use your search engine to find a picture of another famous cathedral. Post a picture of the cathedral on your blog. Underneath the picture tell us: the name of the cathedral, where the cathedral is located, when it was built, and how long it took to build.

The name of this famous Cathedral is Notre Dame. This may look very familiar because of the Disney film The Hunchback and Notre Dame! This is located in Paris/France. It was built in 1163 which is a long time ago. But it took 200 years to build which is amazing.

Thursday, December 21, 2017

Day 5: Bonus Activity - #EarntheFern

Day 5: Bonus Activity!
Questions I will ask Bill Kini
  • What made you start Boxing?
  • Did you ever feel like giving up? If so why?
  • How did it feel to win a gold medal and represent your small country? 
  • Did  it ever come down to you choosing over rugby and boxing? 
  • What sport do you think your most best at? 
Image result for Bill kini

Day 5 : Activity 2 -The Treaty of Waitangi ll Summer Learning Journey

Activity 2: The Treaty of Waitangi
On 6 February 1840, a very special document was signed by the Māori chiefs and the British settlers in New Zealand. It was called the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) and it outlined how the two groups would live together and work together in New Zealand. It was the first document of its kind to be signed in the entire world. The Treaty was signed in a place called Waitangi in northern New Zealand.

Follow this Waitangi village link to read about the village of Waitangi.

On your blog, tell us three fun things that you can do as a visitor in Waitangi. Which one would you like to do the most?
  • Take a tour of the Waitangi River which is absolutely beautiful!
  • Visit Haruru falls and look among the beautiful scenery.
  • Visit The treaty house where history was made!

Day 5 - Activity 1 The Dawn of a New Era ll Summer Learning Journey

Day 5: The Dawn of a New Era…
From the 1840s onwards, many European settlers came to live in New Zealand. It was a difficult period in New Zealand’s history. As the settlers began to outnumber the Māori, a great war erupted between the two groups as they fought for access to land to build homes and establish communities.

Activity 1: Translating Phrases
Unlike the Māori, many of the European settlers didn’t speak Te Reo Māori. Instead, they spoke English. As you can imagine, it was very difficult for the two groups to communicate because they did not have a dictionary or a translator. These days we are able to use the Internet to translate words and phrases from one language to another.

Use Google Translate to translate the following five phrases from English to Te Reo Māori or from Te Reo Māori to English. Post the translations on your blog. Be sure to include the phrase in both the English and Māori to earn full points.

Work Below!

1. Nau mai ki Aotearoa - Welcome to New Zealand
2. Brooke is my name - Ko Brooke toku ingoa
3. What is your name - He aha to ingoa?
4. He pai taku ki te takaro i te whutuparoro - I like to play rugby
5. Where do you come from? - No hea koe

Day 4 Bonus Activity ll Summer Learning Journey

Bonus Activity: Musical Festivals – Matatini

In New Zealand, a huge festival is held every two years, called Te Matatini. This performing arts festival celebrates the tikanga (culture or customs) of Māori. Kapa Haka groups from around New Zealand are invited to attend the festival and each group gives a 25-minute performance. The performances are judged and the best teams win prizes.

The gold medal winning team from this year (2017) was Te Kapa Haka o Whāngārā Mai Tawhiti.

Watch these three clips from previous Te Matatini festivals.

Te Iti Kahurangi

Te Puku o Te Ika

On your blog, rank the performances from your favourite (#1) to least favourite (#3) and tell us why you gave them the ranking that you did.


My work Below!

Day 4: Activity 2 - Playing Games ll Summer Learning Journey

Activity 2: Playing Games R20A-2.jpg
Hundreds of years ago, young Māori children were taught to play a number of games, including Poi Rakau, Ki O Rahi, Koruru Taonga and Poi Toa. Read about each of these four games on the Rangatahi tu Rangatira website. Have you played any of them before? Isn’t it cool how the games have been passed down for generations?

Choose one game, and on your blog, tell us the (i) name of the game, (ii) the goal or purpose of the game, and (iii) two rules.

You could try playing some of the games with a friend.

I have played Ki O Rahi before at my old school. The purpose of the game is to get as many hits at the object in the middle and to to touch as many PO with the ball but make sure not to get your tags taken off you. Two rules for the game is when you get touched you have to stop and the ball is given to the other team. You cant go past the boundaries or else automatically it is the other teams ball.
Image result for ki o rahi

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Day 4: Hitting a High Note - Activity 1 ll Summer Learning Journey

Day 4: Hitting a High Note…

Activity 1: The Waiata - A Song in Your Heart
In the past, Māori would often use song as a way of sharing information or communicating emotions.  A waiata is the name given to a traditional Māori song. One of my all-time favourite waiata is Kia Paimarie. What about you?

Use Google to research traditional Māori Waiata. Listen to a number of Waiata and read the lyrics. On your blog tell us which one of the waiata you found you like the most. Why do you like it?

My Work Below!

Day 3: Bonus Activity ll Summer Learning Journey

Bonus Activity: Fun Family Facts

Everyone’s family is unique. What makes your family special? Choose three people close to you and ask them what their two favourite things to do in summer are.

On your blog, write two fun facts about each person. For example, my Nana plays the bagpipes!


Day 3 - Activity 2: Acknowledging Ancestry ll Summer Learning Journey

Activity 2: Acknowledging Ancestry
All of us are members of a family. Some of us have large families and some of us have very small families. When I have the opportunity to talk about my family and my ancestry I sometimes choose to use a pepeha. It is a very special way of identifying who I am and where I come from. There are many different versions of pepeha but most provide people with information about who you are and where you come from (i.e. your whakapapa). Use the template provided below to prepare your own unique pepeha. If you need help please watch this short movie clip on preparing a pepeha.

My Work Below!

Monday, December 18, 2017

Day 3: It’s All in the Family - Activity 1 ll Summer Learning Journey

Activity 1: The More, the Merrier? victorian family.jpg
In the 1800s, most families were pretty big. In fact, many parents had an average of seven to nine children.  Imagine that you were a child in the 1800s and you had nine siblings.

On your blog, please tell us how you would feel. Would you enjoy being a member of such a large family? Why or why not?

Why or why not I will enjoy having a large family?
In my opinion, I would love to have a big family because when siblings have more kids there will be future generations to carry out the surname. Also, it will be lots of fun living in a house with the more than 5 people because you will always be busy and you will never be bored.

Bonus Activity: Special Meals

Bonus Activity: Special Meals

Back in the 1800s, most Māori ate a simple diet. They ate foods that they could catch in the water (eg. fish) or grow on the land (eg. kumara). They did not have access to a supermarket to buy food for their meals! Speaking of meals, what is your favourite meal? Mine is wood-fired pizza. Yum!

On your blog, post a picture of your favourite meal. Be sure to tell us what it is and why it is your favourite. You could also include the recipe if you have it so that we can all try it!


My Work Below!

Activity 2: The Rules of Engagement

Activity 2: The Rules of Engagement
During the early years in New Zealand, men and women would often marry at a young age. Women were expected to have babies and remain in the home caring for their children. Few, if any, left home in search of work. Men, on the other hand, were expected to work outside of the home.

These days, we don’t have the same strict expectations about work. Girls and boys can choose their own path in life. In fact, I was lucky enough to go to university and to follow my dream of becoming a teacher!

What is your dream job? Draw a picture of yourself doing your dream job and post it on your blog. You could be a doctor, an actor or even a zookeeper! I have drawn myself taking a picture of a beautiful castle in Poland because I would love to become a travel blogger and photographer one day.

I want to be a police officer when I am older because I like helping people.
This is an illustration of what it may look like in the future.

Work Below!

Day 2: It’s All in a Day’s Work - Actvity 1 ll Winter Learning Journey

Day 2: It’s All in a Day’s Work

Activity 1: A House or a Home?

In the 1800s, most Māori lived in villages called pa. Each village had many buildings – kauta where people cooked, pataka where they stored goods and wharepuni where the Māori slept. A traditional wharepuni had a thatched roof and walls made of timber, fern, rushes and bark. Look at the picture below of a traditional wharepuni. Does it look like your house?

On your blog, compare the wharepuni to your own home. What are two similarities and two differences between a wharepuni and your house?

My work Below!

Sunday, December 17, 2017

Bonus Activity: Waka Ama ll Summer Learning Journey

Bonus Activity: Waka Ama
To this day, the people of New Zealand still use waka. Instead of using their waka to transport them from one place to another, they sometimes use waka in special events and in sporting competitions such as Waka Ama. Both boys and girls compete in Waka Ama boat races.

Watch this short video of a Waka Ama race. On your blog tell us whether you would like to be in a Waka Ama race one day. Why or why not?


My Opinion: Why or why not I will participate in a Waka Ama Race
I participated in multiple races in Waka Ama when I used to play this sport. Although I didn't participate at the end of year competition I still gained new skills and had new experiences. So the answer from me is YES! Because it's an amazing adrenalin rush and I like enjoying the fresh air.

Week 1 - Activity 2: Setting Sail ll Summer Learning Journey

Activity 2: Setting Sail

The first settlers to come to New Zealand must have been really brave! They had to leave their original homes and sail thousands of miles across the ocean on a special boat called a ‘waka’ to reach New Zealand.

Imagine that you were on board one of the wakas. On your blog, write a short letter to a friend telling them about your voyage to New Zealand. In the letter be sure to tell them how you feel about moving to a new country. If it was me, I would have felt really nervous…
Here is my work below!

Week 1 - Activity 1: The First Settlers ll Summer Learning Journey

Activity 1: The First Settlers

It is widely believed that the first people to arrive in New Zealand came from Polynesia. Most historians believe that they landed in New Zealand over 700 years ago. Although they were originally from many different countries, these settlers learned to live together and, eventually, formed their own distinct culture known as ‘Māori.’  Māori have their own language, traditions, and culture.

Follow this link to read a short story about a famous man in Māori mythology – Maui. On your blog, post three facts that you learned about this interesting man. What other stories have you heard about Maui?

Here is my work below!